What Should Christian Leadership in Business Look Like?

business-woman-in-meeting

What is Christian Leadership in Business and How Should it Be Done?

Christians not only have callings but also need to heed commands within the context of their family or churches.  As followers of Jesus Christ, we cannot compartmentalize what aspects of our life our faith influences.  In fact, areas like the workplace are among the most important for us to live as an example.  Whether you’re in management or being managed, a business owner or a hired hand, your opportunity to lead others is inevitable in business. 

This article explores the questions and implications of Christian leadership in business: What is different between a Christian Leader and a non-Christian leader?  What does the Bible tell us about business?

Earn your degree in Christian Leadership from Visible Music College

Request more information about Creative Leadership in a Christian context at Visible.

What Does It Mean to be a Christian Leader in Business?

Before we talk about how Christian Leaders handle themselves in business, we must define a Christian leader.

Many characteristics identify a Christian Leader. For simplification, a Christian Leader follows the principles and commands of Jesus Christ as outlined in scripture, but more specifically, they do so because they have devoted their lives to “following Him” or strengthening their divine relationship with God that created them.

In business, that relationship affects how Christians make decisions crucial to their community or creation. Christian Leaders in business will shape their company or corporation through their conviction. They will lead those around them to follow them as they follow Jesus. 

What Does the Bible Say About Business Leadership?

Too often, as Christians approach the idea of business and profit, there is a hesitation that God would not want us concerned about profit or that humility would mean sacrificing “success.” 

This concept is simply askew from what Christ taught.  In the Gospel of Matthew, Jesus explains to His followers the parable of the talents.  In this short story, Christ points out that God provides us the means to work for a profit.  This is as much of a commandment as it is a gift.  The Lord expects us to grow His kingdom.  Pursuing success without our focus on Him is vanity.  

However, Christ expects his followers to lead businesses to the best of their ability, be profitable, create jobs, and impact people and families for His Glory.  Just as Matthew states in chapter 25 (14-30),  we are to invest that which was given to us so that it provides a return.   

Can a Christian Be Successful in Business?

As already mentioned, Christians are not only permitted to be successful in business but are commanded to be successful.  God has created and equipped each of us with specific talents and passions. Maybe your talent is singing, or maybe it’s organizing.  Maybe you’re an expert in graphic design or a chef.  Whatever God has equipped you with, He expects you to use for His glory, not your own.   

Though social success and the Lord’s view of success might often differ, the principle is still the same: Business leaders should provide their best effort to provide their best business results.   They should invest in proper training to understand business processes and techniques just as much as they learn leadership techniques.  

Conclusion

As a Christian Leader in business,  you will not venture anywhere unaffected by your conviction to follow Christ and bear witness to those around you that we were each created with a purpose.  For many believers, that purpose is found in the way they lead their co-workers, the way that they make decisions for the business, and the way that they articulate themselves in business transactions. 

Are you looking for more training or a community to encourage your passion for business?  Visible Music College offers both a bachelor’s and master’s degree in business leadership to help develop you into a Christian Business Leader.

No Comments

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.